PROGRAMS OF SERVICE


During the 1940s, Exchange had organized its club activities around seven areas of service that included: education; agriculture; aviation; citizenship; commerce and industry; federal youth rehabilitation; youth and geriatrics.


Today, three Programs of Service and Exchange’s National Project, the Prevention of Child Abuse, are lenses through which local clubs focus their energy and attention on their communities’ specific needs. The Programs of Service are Americanism, Youth Programs and Community Service. 











Child abuse prevention became Exchange’s National Project in 1979, at the 61st National Exchange Club Convention.To uphold its National Project, Exchange provides a variety of public awareness materials designed to help inform and increase awareness of child abuse and how it can be prevented. Such projects are implemented through Exchange Clubs and Exchange Club Child Abuse Prevention (CAP) Centers across the country.Through the Exchange Parent Aide home visitation model, child abuse prevention experts work directly with at-risk families. To date, Exchange Club CAP Centers have helped more than 691,120 families break the cycle of violence, thus creating safer homes for 1,727,800 children. Exchange was the winner of a Presidential Award from the White House Office of Private Sector Initiatives, is a charter member of The National Child Abuse Coalition, and is a Partner in Prevention with the Children’s Bureau, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

America’s young people are its most precious resource. For many years, Exchange Clubs and National Headquarters have sponsored an impressive selection of activities designed to benefit and encourage our nation’s youth. Through college scholarships, mentoring and guidance, and service recognition, Exchange is making a difference for America’s youngest generations.


The history of Exchange’s Community Service projects is quite impressive. Since the first group of Exchangites convened in 1911 in Detroit, Michigan, Exchange has been dedicated to serving its communities. Throughout the years, Exchange Clubs have been responsible for community endeavors of all types such as, cleaning up highways, sponsoring cultural programs, hosting art and industrial shows, holding state and county fairs and festivals, and organizing rodeos and athletic events. Exchange Clubs have also provided millions of dollars for scholarships, gifts, equipment, sponsorships, educational assistance, and other worthy causes.

The Americanism Program of Service promotes pride in our country, appreciation for the freedoms granted to American citizens, and gratitude to the men and women who serve/have served in the Armed Forces. Americanism celebrates the country’s rich, unique heritage and inspires unity from coast-to-coast.